When one writes a mediocre column

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The e-mails came. And came. And came. And came. And came. One after another after another. Of the 150 or so I received, two were positive. All the others were thoroughly negative.

And rightly so.

For good and for bad, I take great pride in my writing. I don’t just argue for the sake of arguing (I really don’t), and I never hand in columns or books without having read the things, oh, 10 … 15 … 20 times before submission. This is what I do for a living, and I try extremely hard to do it well.

This week, however, I fell short. My most recent SI.com column, a piece ripping the Pittsburgh Pirates for continuous ineptitude, was extremely mediocre—and it pisses me off. I suppose the writing is OK and fine and whatever, but the point I was trying to make was completely lost (thus ruining the whole thing). In short: I started writing about how the Pirates would inevitably waste money on a high-priced, over-the-hill free agent, because it’s what they always do. Yet many of the players I listed as examples, from Eric Hinske to Doug Mientkiewicz, were bargain-basement additions from past years. They weren’t expensive, but relatively cheap, no-frills pieces.

What I wanted to express—but, again, failed miserably at—is that the Pirates always seem to bring in these guys, hype them up in the media as potential answers to team problems … then inevitably look dumb when they fail. While Pittsburgh fans can certainly argue this, at least a valid argument can take place. The way I wrote the column, I just wound up looking naive, stupid and uninformed. Ugh.

Truth be told, I don’t enjoy beating myself up. But I do believe in accountability. If we in the media are going to call out others for their shortcomings, we also need to be able to call out ourselves. I dropped the ball.

One more thing—Pirate bloggers were pretty damn vicious in ripping me … and from Free Tank Carter to Bucs Dugout, I applaud them for it. In the old days, writers and reporters could get away with mediocrity. Sure, some angry people might call the newsroom or write a letter to the editor. But it came and went, no biggie. Nowadays, however, bloggers are absolutely everywhere, looking for that next mistake to pounce upon. From this perspective, it’s not always comfortable. But it’s needed.

70 thoughts on “When one writes a mediocre column”

  1. “He can go out and relax and play and we can build around him.”

    I certainly wouldn’t tell my fans we were going to build a team around him and then turn around and trade him. That’s lying and is typically frowned upon.

    Saying the Gold Glove is a joke because it’s not sabermetric sure is taking a lot away from guys like Ken Griffey Jr., Mike Schmidt, Ozzie Smith, Ryne Sandberg and Roberto Clemente, who all won that award multiple times. Oh, and are Hall of Famers. That’s your opinion, and you’re certainly entitled to it, but I know a lot of people who would disagree with you on that point.

    I certainly never said anything along the lines of those players you named being difficult to replace because those players never put up the numbers that Nate McLouth did. So I don’t know why you’d assume I’d think something like that.

    And I’m not upset that Huntington is trading higher priced veterans for lower priced prospects, but it’s who Huntington is getting in these trades that doesn’t make sense. If you can’t understand that, I can put it in caps for you. The players he’s getting in return are average/below average minor league players. That’s where I have a problem with what he’s doing. Those players that put up average/below average minor league status put up the same type of major league stats, like Andy LaRoche, Ross Olendorf, Jeff Karstens, Brandon Moss, etc.

  2. This comment is good food for thought from that blog:

    http://www.bucsdugout.com/2009/12/29/1223425/on-discussing-the-pirates

    Charlie,

    One additional comment today….

    “…or blames Huntington and Coonelly for their inability to magically transform a thoroughly trashed organization into a World Series team within a month of being hired.”

    Putting the fact that they inhereted [sic] a last place club and that there is only one direction to go but up ……

    I can accept the “Rome wasn’t built in a day” explanation however tell me when we can expect a winner. Give me a timeline and then be willing to be accountable if it isn’t met.

    There are not too many jobs in the world today that allow for poor performance for an indefinite period time.

    The Coonelly and Huntington front office inhereted [sic] a last place club and it has remained there. If the idea is that they needed to get the house in order, fine. But when is it reasonable to expect them to begin producing improved results on the field?

    How long is it before we start holding Huntington accountable for his decisions? Again, I’m not saying that the moves he’s making aren’t going to end up working out, because we all lack that foresight. But what I am saying is if you look at the numbers, the trades he is making aren’t bringing in helpful pieces to our farm system.

  3. The thing you always have to consider in trades is that the other team has to be willing to trade the players you want.

    Who were the Pirates supposed to get for Nady and Marte? A-Rod? Or perhaps a prospect package of Phil Hughes, Ian Kennedy and Austin Jackson? No team is going to give up the prospects you seem to want to receive for an average (and injury prone!) outfielder and a lefty specialist. MLB teams weren’t even giving up those kinds of deals for Roy Halladay! Why would they give them up for Pirates castoffs?

    What about Nyjer Morgan and Sean Burnett? Were the Pirates supposed to get Ryan Zimmerman? Good luck with that.

    Tell me some packages YOU would have tried to get back for these players.

    You’re right…Jason Kendall’s numbers were never similar to McLouth’s. When he played with the Pirates, Kendall’s numbers were better.

    Also, Andy LaRoche’s minor league numbers were far from “average/below average.” His career minor league line is .295/.382/.517. His career AAA numbers were .310/.412/.544 with 33 homers in 707 plate appearances. When he was in the minor leagues, he was widely regarded as one of the best prospects in the game. It’s become obvious that you don’t know anything about prospects.

  4. Jason Kendall never hit more than 14 home runs, scored more than 112 runs, or had more than 75 RBIs while with Pittsburgh. All of which Nate had more of in his one full season.

    You really hate Nate McLouth and I’m not sure why. He’s a nice guy, plays hard, great cook, puts up good numbers.

    It’s become obvious I know enough about prospects that I’m more excited about what a prospect does when they get called up than what they did in the minors. Like hit .233/.306/.666. Which isn’t good, silly. Was I excited two years ago when got Andy LaRoche? Sure. Does he look lost at the plate and in the field in the bigs? An awful lot.

    Did you look at any of the other players “average/below average” stats while you were snooping around the stat house?

  5. Nate says, “Hermansen was at every point of his career an over-rated prospect, but I still think he could have been a somewhat productive player if he wasn’t rushed through the system so quickly. That said, his line was never as impressive as Sanchez’s.”

    How was he overrated? All of the publications at the time put him on the fast track to Pittsburgh, to replace Al Martin. He was our number one prospect, for crying out loud. Note: That sound you heard was sarcasism.

    As for Sanchez, he is a glimmer of hope during his extremely brief pro career, but I disagree with your assessment that it was a mixed bag after the top two picks. After Strasburg and Ackley, there was a group of 6-7 players, Sanchez was in the group after that. The one in the second group was a SS, Grant Green from USC was passed on because he was represented by Boras. Didn’t want to go through that again.

    I use potential as a derisive term because it’s someone’s expectations based on what they see and their feelings. If you have even seen the pre-draft analysis of players, they use the terms, should fill out, projects to be, and similar to put your favorite player name here. It’s not an exact science, therefore, it should be derided at every opportunity.

    Hell, Neil Walker has potential. For what, I don’t know, but the potentail is there.

    I have no problem trading veterans for prospects, just make sure the guy really is a prospect. You’ve seen the top-ten list of prospects that are put out. Have you ever seen one where they say, Sorry, this team only has 4 legit guys”? No, everyone gets ten. I’m tired of hearing that Player A was that teams 5th best prospect, after doing squat to deserve a ranking like that, short of being drafted in the first round. There is no doubt that a top ten list for TB a few years ago, surpasses anything the Pirates had.

    Also, quit trading for guys that have failed at the MLB level. Karstens, Moss, LaRoche, Clement fit that bill. Did I expect to get Kennedy, Hughes, and Melky for Nady and Marte? No, but I want more than someone’s deadbeats. Package Doumit with them and get Kennedy and Tabata. If you don’t, walk away from the table. There was no rush in trading either Nady or Bay at that moment.

    Wasn’t that the stated goal in the Seattle deal? Throw in cash to finish Jack’s contract and get better prospects. We got Jack’s replacement, 3 minor league pitchers of dubious distintion, and someone pencilled in to keep Garret Jones on the bench, Clement. Seems smart to me.

    As for Littlefield and Creech running a draft, let’s give them Huntington’s purse at the same time. Weiters would be ours. Then we could have used the purse again to get the SS of the future. Instead, we get Cedeno, Crosby, and Bixler.

    As for Kendall his BA and OBP were better but McLouth had better Slugging and steals. The thing lost in the Kendall Mystic, was this great defensive guy. Sorry, it’s just not true. His SB/CS were crappy short of a few seasons. If you remember his injury year, the staff ERA dropped close to a run, AFTER he got hurt. Joe Oliver couldn’t hit worth crud, but that was not why he was brought in.

  6. “As for Littlefield and Creech running a draft, let’s give them Huntington’s purse at the same time. Weiters would be ours. Then we could have used the purse again to get the SS of the future. Instead, we get Cedeno, Crosby, and Bixler.”

    Every report out at that time said that Littlefield was given the go-ahead to spend on Wieters, but he wanted to spend that money at the Major League level instead. That’s how we ended up with Danny Moskos in the draft and Matt Morris and his huge contract.

    In the draft, projecting is all you can do. What should the Pirates do instead? Look at and say “nobody in this whole class has proven ANYTHING at the Major League level! Screw the draft!”

    Where have you heard that Clement is pencilled in to keep Jones on the bench? He’s pencilled in to play first, and Jones is pencilled in to play right field. Would you rather Jones at first and Moss in right field?

    Grant Green was one of the better prospects in the draft, but he’s not a good enough prospect to command something like the $6 million we paid Alvarez. He should be a fine shortstop, but nothing special. There’s a chance that could be the case with Sanchez, too, and it’s what most thought before the draft. I think there’s just a difference of opinion here. I feel like the Pirates did the smart thing by spreading the money around and signing lots of later round guys above slot, you think they should have overpaid Grant Green and signed fewer impact guys later.

    As for the McLouth/Kendall comparison, OBP is the most important hitting stat there is, hands down. Kendall absolutely smoked McLouth in that category. He never had much home run power, but before his wrist injury he had a good deal of doubles power. Kind of like a healthy Doumit. The point isn’t to quibble about stats, it’s to say they’re similar players – nice to have, but not impossible to replace.

  7. These comments are so funny to me. Before people start posting, they should look some things up.

    How old is Tababta?
    How did Littlefield rebuild?
    Does age matter?

    Tabata is very young for his league. Players his age are not in Triple A. Would people seriously rather have Nady over Tabata and Ohlendorf?

    Littlefield never tied to rebuild the Pirates. He dumped salary and never drafted well or made international signings either. He brought in some old veterans and overpaid for them too.

    Huntington has not done anything similar to Littlefield. That is a good thing. There is more talent in the Pirates’ system now than there was for the five years Littlefield was in charge.

    I liked McLouth, but the Pirates sold high. McLouth is not going to do any better than what he did in 2008. Huntington recognized that and got a good return for him.

    Milledge is younger and has a lot more potential. Milledge hasn’t had the success as McLouth’s one quality season, but he is three years younger with more upside.

    The Pirates are rebuilding. When you rebuild, you get younger in the process. They might not have been trying to deal McLouth, but a good deal came about and Huntington couldn’t pass it up.

    The Pirates are rebuilding. I don’t know why so many fans keep forgetting that. Huntington is doing the right thing in drafting well and trading away the older veterans.

    Every good team built a core first. Only the 1997 Marlins bought their whole team on the open market. The Yankees, Red Sox, Rays, Cardinals, and Dodgers (to name a few) all built a core. They have brought in other guys to fill in the holes.

    The Pirates are still putting together that core. Only time will tell if they will go out and spend that extra money to bring in what is needed. New Owner (third year) Bob Nutting said he will spend when the time is right. That time is not now.

  8. Also, I want to clear up that I don’t “hate” Nate McLouth. On the contrary, I liked him a lot when he was with Pittsburgh. Regardless, he’s nothing more than a good complementary player.

  9. Nate says, “Every report out at that time said that Littlefield was given the go-ahead to spend on Wieters, but he wanted to spend that money at the Major League level instead. That’s how we ended up with Danny Moskos in the draft and Matt Morris and his huge contract.”

    Sorry Nate, you’re wrong. Littlefield asked McClatchy to ask Nutting for the go ahead and was rebuffed. After the fact, Nutting said he was never asked to “OK” an increase in the draft budget. Also, he said he would have approved it. By throwing Nutting under the bus, Littlefield, if he hadn’t done enough to get canned, sealed his fate that day. Personally, I trust nothing coming out of the mouths of Littlefield, McClatchy, or Nutting.

    We ended up with Morris as an appeasement to show that Nutting is willing to spend money. As if, Burnitz, Randa, and the Casey fiasco wasn’t enough to show that they could flush cash like the Mets.

    Nate says, “Where have you heard that Clement is pencilled in to keep Jones on the bench? He’s pencilled in to play first, and Jones is pencilled in to play right field. Would you rather Jones at first and Moss in right field?”

    Jones is penciled in, BUT his defense in RF leaves alot to be desired. Moss is scheduled to play about a third of the time and be a late inning replacement. Insert tone here: You can’t underestimate the value of Jones being a PH. End tone.

    Who said to pay Grant Green Alvarez money? I’m saying they cheaped out by drafting someone signable at less than slot. Since some here like to spout projections, if I remember correctly: good glove and range, projects to be .280 with 15+ HRs and less than 10 SBs. There so many of this type in the Pirate system already, I can see why’d they pass. NOW, if they had signed Sano, I could understand passing, but they didn’t.

    Nate says, “I feel like the Pirates did the smart thing by spreading the money around and signing lots of later round guys above slot, you think they should have overpaid Grant Green and signed fewer impact guys later.”

    Using that logic, they should have bypassed Alvarez and overpaid for lesser talent to replenish the minors. Please, pick one side of an argument.

    As for Kendall/McLouth, I stand by my original statement. Besides, runs produced is the most important stat (remember, it’s the score that determines the winner, not OBP), and McLouth averages 20+ more per season, based on 162 games played per season.

  10. Trust me, I’m not here to defend anything Littlefield did during his time here, but you have to agree that he was not given the same tools and orders as Huntington.

    In the Ramirez trade, he was under the gun by McClatchy to get $1 million. Kevin needed to pay back a loan to…the Nuttings. Once it was known, and it got out quickly, he had no leverage. But to take Bobby Hill and dump Bruback who he also got in the deal, was just plain stupid.

    In 2006, he was given the orders to get better quickly, because of the All-Star game. If you watched the Anatomy of a Trade that FSN-Pit did, you’d pull your hair out. They could have gotten Overbay for a couple of nothing minor leaguers. They could have gotten Blalock for a better package of minor leaguers. Instead, they chose Casey and $500K for Dave Williams. Knowing that Casey was to be a FA at the end of the season, it was a stupid deal, but the PR department needed the hometown kid to push on the fans.

    The Burnitz and Randa signings only prove that he had to overpay to get anyone to come here.

    As for international signings, that budget was close to nothing that it would have been better to be eliminated. Also, if you remember during that same timeframe, the Pirates had no advance scout. This team was being run on stretched out rubber band, a wad of gum, and pencil shavings. Even MacGyver would have just thrown up his hands.

  11. Dogknot says, “There is more talent in the Pirates’ system now than there was for the five years Littlefield was in charge.”

    Really, short of the expectations of Tabata, Alavarez, Sanchez and possibly D. McCutchen, who is there? The current MLB pitching staff is different, but I wouldn’t call it better. With Bullington, Van Benschoten, Burnett and Bradley, it was supposed to play out alot differently and might have, if the arm problems hadn’t developed.

    The lack of position players ready to move up in the lower minors, just shows that Huntington has the same belief system as Littlefield and it’s take care of the pitching and worry about the offense later.

    Look at the stats from Altoona, http://web.minorleaguebaseball.com/milb/stats/stats.jsp?t=t_ibp&cid=452 Nothing earth shattering there. Look at Lynchburg,
    http://web.minorleaguebaseball.com/milb/stats/stats.jsp?t=t_ibp&cid=481 Even less.

    Now with the trade talk of Doumit and Duke (can you say salary arbitration dump?), how is Huntington any different?

  12. my take on all of this: 1) i generally think that the management regime of the pirates is doing what they need to do with the cards they have been dealt. winning wasn’t happening with the players they had, so why continue on the same path? i’m not judging individual trades by saying this, but i am commending mgt on doing what i feel is necessary.
    2) gold gloves are (largely) awarded to people with very high fielding percentages which, besides wins, is the most overrated stat in baseball. jack wilson hasn’t won a gold glove b/c he gets to so many balls, hence has a higher chance at making more errors. plus, he can’t hit. voters tend to use that as a metric in their voting decision as well. cite ozzie smith if you will as an argument against the last sentence, but he could at least run. and he was far and away better defensively then his peers.
    3) mclouth was way overrated by pirates fans. he was at best average defensively. mclouth looked like a good cf b/c he had to make so many running/diving catches that look good to the untrained eye. check out the poor jumps he got on many of those nice looking catches, and you will then realize that he’s not a good fielder. is he an above average hitter? sure. i would love to have him on my team as a complimentary player. should he have been traded? debatable, but imo yes. if i remember correctly he was putting up resistance on moving to a corner of spot to make room for cutch (who, btw, is a much better defensive center fielder even though he is still a bit raw). that is ultimately the deciding factor on why i he was traded.
    4) minor league stats aren’t the best barometer on how good barometer on how someone will do in the majors. see steve pierce. see jj davis. see joe koshansky. see chad hermanson. see brad eldred. see nate mclouth. he hit 40 hr in 2422 ab’s (one every 61 ab’s). tabata is at 26 in 1836 (one every 71 ab’s). that includes time battling a wrist injury. milledge hit 38 in 1559 (one every 41 ab’s). my point: mclouth has demonstrated 20 hr power in the majors. who’s to say tabata or milledge won’t? the first few mentioned tore up the minors and did nothing in the majors. you can’t tell until sufficient time has been given to prospects to prove themselves. does that absolve pirates mgt for trading mclouth? no. i’m just saying to give it time until you rip them. i believe that trading mclouth was the right thing to do b/c the pirates were never going to win with him. if he hit 25 hr for the next three years before he was traded, who cares? the pirates weren’t going to win in those seasons, b/c they wouldn’t have enough of a team around him to win b/c nutting won’t spend money. why not take some chances and at least have a shot at winning in the future if things pan out with prospects? that goes for the other trades as well. you can analyze them all you want, but i feel that bold moves needed to be made. and they were. time will tell if they pan out. if they don’t, what changes? not the pirates record, that’s for sure. if they somehow do and the pirates become competitive, then great.

    so, before i get bashed, i want to reiterate what my overall point is: my point wasn’t to analyze individual trades, or to absolve current mgt on prospects received from these trades that may miss. it was to point out that the pirates weren’t winning with mclouth, bay, wilson, sanchez, et. al. which had been proven over the past several years, so why not play your cards and take some bold chances?

  13. “Jones is penciled in, BUT his defense in RF leaves alot to be desired.”

    True, but last year was also his first year playing right field at any level. Considering that, he didn’t look so bad out there. He has the physical tools to be a successful right fielder, it’s just a matter of learning the fundamentals of the position. Unfortunately, he wasn’t taught those fundamentals in the Twins system, so he has to learn them in Pittsburgh.

    “Moss is scheduled to play about a third of the time and be a late inning replacement. Insert tone here: You can’t underestimate the value of Jones being a PH. End tone.”

    I’m sure Moss will be a defensive replacement, which makes sense to me. He’s a good defender. As for Jones being a PH, I doubt it. Delwyn Young has that role locked down.

    “Who said to pay Grant Green Alvarez money? I’m saying they cheaped out by drafting someone signable at less than slot.”

    Actually, Sanchez’s contract was a little bit over slot. He and Grant Green signed for about the same about of money…in the $2.5 million range. Is it possible the Bucs just liked Sanchez more?

    “Since some here like to spout projections, if I remember correctly: good glove and range, projects to be .280 with 15+ HRs and less than 10 SBs. There so many of this type in the Pirate system already, I can see why’d they pass. NOW, if they had signed Sano, I could understand passing, but they didn’t.”

    That’s about the same as where Sanchez projected. The players were basically interchangeable with the bat, it was the position and skill at the position that distinguished them. At the time of the draft, the Pirates were thin at both SS and C, but slightly thinner at C.

    “Using that logic, they should have bypassed Alvarez and overpaid for lesser talent to replenish the minors. Please, pick one side of an argument.”

    Not the same thing. Alvarez was far and away the best talent in the draft, and is seen as a once-in-a-lifetime type of talent. Grant Green and almost everyone else in the first round past Ackley and Strasburg were seen as potentially good players. Of course they should have paid for Alvarez.

    “As for Kendall/McLouth, I stand by my original statement. Besides, runs produced is the most important stat (remember, it’s the score that determines the winner, not OBP), and McLouth averages 20+ more per season, based on 162 games played per season.”

    By runs produced, I’m assuming you mean runs scored here, which is a fallacy. Kendall played in weaker lineups than did McLouth, so his chances to score runs were fewer. OBP is more important because it removes team context. You have to get on before you can score.

    As for runs above replacement…the data collected on FanGraphs only goes back to 2002, thereby cutting out Kendall’s most productive years as a Pirate. Still…

    Jason Kendall runs above replacement:

    2002: 27.3
    2003: 52.1
    2004: 45.7

    McLouth:

    2005: 4.1
    2006: -3.9
    2007: 16.2
    2008: 35.1
    2009 (between Pirates and Braves): 36.1

    So even at his worst, Kendall was better than McLouth.

    I’ll admit that early in his tenure, Littlefield was hamstrung by ownership. It’s possible Bonifay was too, but I doubt that considering the massive contracts he handed out to players like Kendall.

    Still, that’s no excuse for making the boneheaded moves Littlefield made. For example, he could have gotten cheaper and better by trading Kris Benson for Ryan Howard, but he didn’t do it because we had Brad Eldred in the system.

    And even then, later in the McClatchy/Littlefield years, Littlefield was given more purse to work with. He still made consistently bad decisions.

    The fact is that smart GMs can work on a shoestring budget. The Twins, Marlins, Rays, Brewers and Athletics have all done it at various points. The budget hampers success, but it doesn’t destroy it.

    Finally, he said the system has more talent now than it did under Littlefield. That’s not saying it’s a great system, but the Pirates have made big strides in the talent in the system.

  14. Hey Vaffanculo,

    If you don’t see the differences between Littlefield and Huntington then you aren’t looking very closely.

    Littlefield never rebuilt. Not once did he clean house and start from scratch. Huntington is doing the opposite and has made more strides in two years than what Littlefield did in five.

    I am shocked that a Pirates’ fan (assuming) doesn’t realize that or see the differences.

    I think it is funnier that you brought up Bullington and Van Benschoten too. Bullington might have been a top college pitcher in the draft, but he wasn’t the best player. Van Benschoten was drafted as a pitcher instead of a hitter. These were two very bad picks to start the Littlefield era. By the way, Bradley and Burnett were not drafted by Littlefield.

    It is pretty clear to me how Huntington is different. It is sad that you can’t see that.

  15. Dogknot, good point bringing up the Van Benschoten as a hitter thing. If I remember correctly, he had the most homers in all of NCAA the year the Pirates drafted him. I know for a fact he was considered one of the best hitting prospects in the draft. And they converted him to a pitcher.

  16. Dogknot, I am looking closely. I want quality in the trades, not quantity. The Ramirez-Lofton for crap and cash deal, looks very similar to the Bay deal, which looks very similar to the Nady deal, which looks very similar to the McLouth deal. Notice the trend?

    Examine the Bay trade and see that they already gave up on Moss. They’re close to giving up on LaRoche. Nobody really knows if and when Hansen will come back. So it’s down to Bay for Morris. Quantity over quality.

    Examine the Nady trade and see that they got Karstens and Ohlendorf, but remember they both failed with the Yankees. Can you say Bobby Hill? The jury is still out on Tabata and D-Cutch, so this could be a wash to a win, but again, quantity over quality.

    As for the McLouth deal, it had the fingerprints of a Littlefield deal. Trade a guy because he has an affordable (Pirate) contract for a guy you lost out in previous negotiations. Neal wanted Locke as part of any Atlanta-Bay trade. Wow, a separated at birth moment.

    All of these trades were made for “organizational depth” and “potential”. Now, where have we heard those words before?

  17. ftiliws, 1) All Admins do what they think is necessary to get the job done. The problem is still having the leadership in place to understand what the problem is and how to fix it. With Nutting anywhere decision making, it’s going to be done cheaply.

    2) While I agree that sometimes the GG is used as a reward for offense, Jack didn’t win a GG because the voters saw how much of a gift he got from the hometown scorer in previous years. As much as I think his defense was a product of a PR machine over talent, (It’s not like you could have pumped his o numbers. They are what they are.) if he would have stayed with the Pirates the entire season, or at least the NL, he deserved a GG last year.

    3) McLouth wasn’t overhyped to the extent of Kendall or Wilson, so I think the fans judged him appropriately. I agree that he is a complimentary player, but with the impending trades of Wilson and Sanchez, having a veteran player on the field for Cutch was crucial. Someone to help him adjust to PNC and MLB. Personally, I would have put Cutch in left, only to get used to the notch and PNC. Nyjer filled the veteran void, until they shipped him out. I understand that they weren’t going to win many games, but I didn’t receive a rebate on my tickets for packing it in by August.

    4) Since they’re not going to win this year, who do they ship out? At some point, you have to put down stakes and say, “we’re locking in these players because in x years, we will have the pieces together.” If all you keep doing is changing the pieces, you’re not solving the problem.

    Now with all of the infused talent, from recent trades, in the minors and the MLB roster, it’s pretty much Huntington’s show, top to bottom. We’ll see how much, as an organization they actually improve.

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