One. Nine. Five.

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Posted two weeks ago about weighing 201 and feeling terrible.

Weighed myself today: 195.

Elated!

Funny thing is, we’d just returned from a vacation where I sorta put the diet aside and ate like a pig. Hell, you try strolling the boardwalk of Ocean City, N.J. and not buying a big ol’ tub of Jonhson’s Caramel Corn. But, through the 4 1/2 days away, I didn’t 100-percent pig out. Maybe 75 percent. But not 100.

A big key for me has been a new discovery: Raw corn on the cob. Never tried it before, took a bite on a whim the other day—fantastic. Stew Leonard’s sells this insanely flavorful corn—10 ears for $2.99. It has more sugar than carrots (0 sugar), but it’s waaay better than my normal diet of cookies and cereal.

On a side note, a quick though about Jay Glazer’s defenders, and specifically the guy who asked, “What, he can’t have any friends who are athletes?” The answer to this question is a very simple No, he can’t have friends who he covers. Can’t. It’s an enormous conflict of interest, and he’s proof of it. It’s ludicrous. Insulting. Sad. Horrible. And, mostly, unprofessional.

9 thoughts on “One. Nine. Five.”

  1. Consider this scenario:

    You have a friend that you’ve known since high school, a close friend. You grow up to be a journalist. He grows up to be a MLB player. You end up working for his team. He’s married & you find out he’s cheating on his wife. What would you do?

    *I’m not sure why you chose to mention this here.

  2. Jacob, I think that your scenario proves Mr. Pearlman’s point–a true journalist would refuse to cover his old friend because he has to consider the friendship when deciding whether he will report on an issue. A reporter that is unencumbered by a social relationship can think about the merits of reporting on an extramarital affair (per your example) and judge the “newsworthiness” of the player’s actions. The friendship never enters into the equation.

    Glazer, despite his claims of objectivity, has chosen to enter into relationships that will, on some level, effect his impartiality (he has to, even briefly, consider the social and financial ramifications of reporting on a client/friend).

    I trust the reporter that keeps the players at a distance.

  3. @Jacob

    It’s called conflict of interest. As a journo, you avoid it at all costs. I’ve always explained it like this: If you walked into a cafeteria and would sit down with a person to have lunch, they are a conflict. Don’t interview them and don’t cover what they do.

    And besides, your scenario is highly unlikely — what ball player would befriend a lowly journalist?

  4. @Dan & Joe

    Yes, I understand all of that. But, in my scenario Jeff would be in too deep. Would he be a “genuine reporter” and stick to his “journalistic standards”, which seem extremely important to him? If not, then maybe these precious standards aren’t as important as he thinks.

    1. Jacob:

      To begin with, the idea of “most reporters” being money-hungry vultures is laughably naive. Do you have any idea what salaries are like in this business? Seriously, do you? If you’re looking for money-hungry vultures, try B.P., Goldman, etc … etc. Because, for the most part, you’re barking up the wrong tree.

      As for your scenario (You have a friend that you’ve known since high school, a close friend. You grow up to be a journalist. He grows up to be a MLB player. You end up working for his team. He’s married & you find out he’s cheating on his wife. What would you do?)—it’s a silly one. If I’m working for his team, as you say, it’s a non-issue. Because one who is employed by a major league team is not a journalist. So what’s the issue? Furthermore, an athlete cheating on his wife is not, in and of itself, a story. I’ve known of plenty of athletes cheating on their wives, and I’ve never written about it. But if, for example (one I used earlier) you know—as a journalist—that Matt Leinart is partying with hookers, and Arizona’s coaches seem to think he looks fatigued or he doesn’t work hard enough, what do you do? If you’re Glazer, and you have such info, what do you do?

      Clearly, Jacob, you have a beef with journalists. And maybe me. And I’m certain that, if you dig enough, you’ll find plenty of examples where I’ve messed up. But I do try to hold myself to certain journalist ideals—ones that used to be set in stone.

  5. Okay, thanks for your reply.

    Nobody’s perfect. I was just hoping to give you another perspective on the issue. I’m a big Poz fan. And, you’re alright too, I guess. But, I don’t agree with a lot of the things that you say. I think maybe you “have a beef” with athletes. Perhaps, because of the one who bullied you in HS.

    The “money-hungry vultures” thing was alluding to some of your work, like the Bonds book. I mean, you did write the book & slam the guy to make money.

    “But if, for example (one I used earlier) you know—as a journalist—that Matt Leinart is partying with hookers, and Arizona’s coaches seem to think he looks fatigued or he doesn’t work hard enough, what do you do? If you’re Glazer, and you have such info, what do you do?”

    Seeing how Glazer & Leinart are buddies or something, I’d probably tell Matt: “You need to cut that stuff out. If you don’t, I’m reporting it.” I’d give him a chance to get his things in order.

    *I’m not a reporter, of course.

    1. Jacob, it’s fine. But, again, I’d argue your take if off. Yes, I make money off of books, just as you make money of whatever your job is. But I semi-resent the “you did write the book & slam the guy to make money.” Bud, you have absolutely NO idea how much work goes into these projects. None. “Slam” the guy? I fucking busted my ass for months desperate for people to give me positive Bonds stories. D-e-s-p-e-r-a-t-e. My goal wasn’t to slam Bonds, or even to write a negative book. I just wanted to tell his life story; to write a definitive biography. But when you speak with 500 (or so) people who know someone, and 450 say he’s a jerk (and worse), what are you supposed to do? Again, I’m a journalist, not a publicist.

      And the same goes for Jay Glazer. It’s not his job/place to tell Matt Leinart to “cool it,” because he shouldn’t even have that relationship with the man. If you wanna cover the NFL, great. If you wanna train players, great. But you can’t do both and maintain your integrity. You just can’t.

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