Cam and Rod and the Rickster and Tamir

Have received some interesting responses to the Cam Newton post. A couple of ‘Well, he has a scholarship—that’s a free education, just for playing a game.’

I understand the view, but it’s very simple.

These kids are cattle, used and chewed up until there’s no milk. Scholarships are generally year to year, and if you suddenly don’t produce—adios. Two examples that come to my mind are Roderick Rhodes and Tamir Goodman, two former high-profile basketball players. Rhodes was a big-time recruit for Rick Pitino at Kentucky in the mid-90s, but never quite lived up to the hype. When he was debating whether to return for his senior year, Pitino told him not to. Rhodes was no longer wanted as a player. Hence, he sat out a year and transfered to Southern Cal.

Goodman, aka “the Jewish Jordan” was a highly touted prep player who starred at a Jewish high school in a Jewish league. He averaged 35.4 points per game for the Talmudical Academy of Baltimore. Maryland coach Gary Williams was all over Goodman—recruited him hard, made all sorts of promises, signed him to a scholarship. Then, when Williams learned that Goodman, ahem sort of stunk, he let the player know he was no longer wanted; that the school couldn’t meet his needs, etc. He transferred to Towson State.

The stories are endless. Schools use and use and use these kids, until they can’t be used anymore.

Again, I used to slam guys like Cam Newton.

Now? I say take the dough.

1 thought on “Cam and Rod and the Rickster and Tamir”

  1. I wonder how many times the lost scholarship is blamed on not producing when it is actually a bigger problem.
    Often when a player doesn’t produce it is because he doesn’t work. If that attitude is also carried in the classroom then the scholarship should be removed.
    Sometimes we grow up when everything is taken away.

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