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Ed Quigley

A good man. Rest in peace, Ed Quigley ...
A good man. Rest in peace, Ed Quigley …

Earlier today was scanning Facebook when I saw this heartbreaking posting from Jim Fischer, my former cross country and track coach at the University of Delaware …

quigI did a little Googling and, indeed, found the awful news. Ed Quigley—husband, father of three, hospital employee and former Blue Hen teammate, had died.

I was crushed.

It’s a weird thing to say. I was teammates with Ed for but one season, when I was a freshman and he was a senior. We weren’t particularly tight. We hadn’t spoken in more than 20 years. Hell, I’m not even sure whether we exchanged messages on Facebook (though we were Facebook friends).

And yet, with the news, I found myself thinking back to my freshman year in Newark, Delaware, when I was a truly awful runner and Ed—a smart kid out of Pennsylvania—was a good one. Although I had no business being on that team (among Division I studs, I was a mid-level NAIA scrub), I was embraced and encouraged by my peers. None were kinder or more enthusiastic than Ed, who always offered a warm word; was quick with advice; rarely complained and seemed to eternally see the bright side. I fondly recall the long training runs the team took together—eight … nine … ten miles of free banter and ragging and debating. Ed was a big part of the scene; a key part of the scene. I feel like I can still hear his voice. It was soft. Understated.

Over the course of the afternoon, I thought much about Ed, his wife Tristan, his children. I thought about dreamy days from long ago, when we were young and optimistic and happy to trot through the wooded acres behind Christiana Towers.

At one point, as thoughts of Ed Quigley darted through my head, I was shocked to see the local high school cross country team jog past my car on a training run. They were breathing heavily, long legs galloping, arms churning, slicing through the cold air.

It seemed appropriate.

Wonderfully appropriate.

2 replies on “Ed Quigley”

Jeff – thanks for sharing this. I was a few years older than Ed and was probably captain of the high school cross country and track teams by the time he started running. The first thing I thought of when I heard the news was very similar to what you wrote – no matter how far we were running, or what kind of training we were doing, Ed had the most positive and encouraging words to say. It is great to hear that he carried that same attitude through a college running career as well. Thank you again for sharing.

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Words cannot express how much Ed will be missed by his coworkers & cohorts in San Diego. Many of us are just devastated. The UCSD Department of Pediatrics as created the “Ed Quigley Prize”, which will be “awarded annually to faculty or staff at UCSD or RCHSD who has contributed significantly to the administration of research related to child health”.

As mentioned above, he leaves behind 3 young girls, age 5 to 1 1/2 (roughly). Anyone interested in donating to their support and colledge fund can do so via a crowddfunding website was established by a close friend at http://www.gofundme.com/5d8gxg

We’ll miss you Ed. Rest well my friend.

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