Bigotry disguised as morality

I have decided that I am tired. Sick and tired. Too often in this country, bigotry is cloaked by religion. We allow people to discriminate in the name of faith; to banish a group of people to hell because God or Jesus or Moses say it’s the righteous way.

I am officially committing to no longer accepting this as an OK belief.

I am officially committed to placing these people in the same department as bigots and racists.

I am officially committed to changing the way of thinking.

With all no due respect, one cannot deny gay couples the right to be foster parents and consider himself/herself moral and decent and just. It just doesn’t work that way; can’t work that way. Not with, literally, hundreds of thousands of parent-less children in need of loving homes. I am soooooo sick of this, that I’m willing to write this angry, somewhat direction-less diatribe.

Who, in the name of Jesus, thinks it’s better for kids to not have a home than to be embraced by love—whether that love comes from straight people or gay people? Who can look at a loving gay couple—men or women—and rightly say it is sinful? Indecent? Foul? Wrong?

Here is the truth, and I challenge anyone to dispute it: When it comes to sexuality, the devoutly religious don’t love the sinners but hate the sins. They hate the sinners and the sins. They are sickened (to be extremely blunt) by the idea of a man injecting his penis in another man’s rear end. Literally, they are disgusted—repulsed—by this vision, and what it means to them.
They find it gross; repulsive; unnatural; ungodly. Maybe their marriage is down the crapper; maybe their wife is screwing the mailman; maybe they loathe the structure of their lives—the two cars, the home, the mortgage, the yapping kids and the yapping dog. But despite this, they refuse to engage in alternative visions; to accept that maybe, just maybe, there are other ways for people to live. They have their ideals, and they stick by them. Compassion be damned.

Quite frankly, I am worn down by the narrow-minded among us running things. Why aren’t gays allowed in the military? Because the dolts feel uncomfortable. Why can’t gays marry? Because the dolts say marriage—which 50-percent of the time doesn’t last—is the “bedrock” of society. Why can’t gays adopt? Because what if the kids catch “The Gay?”

Enough. Here’s the truth: What if the kids catch “The Gay?” So what? Why is being gay any worse/better than being straight? Why should I be bothered if, one day, my daughter or son come to me and tell me they’re gay? Why is such a lifestyle less valuable? Too often, we answer the dolts with, “There’s no connection between gay parents and their children also ‘becoming’ gay.” It’s a terrible reply, because it implies that something would be terribly wrong if they “turn” gay.

Anyhow, I’m sick of it all. I’m a straight American male who believes in complete, 100-percent equal rights and status for gays. If your Bible tells you otherwise, well, might I suggest some different literature …

3 thoughts on “Bigotry disguised as morality”

  1. Truthfully, I’m tired of everyone blaming religion for bigotry. I’m a religious person and my God, my church and I don’t practice that kind of discrimination. I know it’s the vocal minority–maybe even majority–that’s giving the rest of us a bad rap. But for the record, “religion” and “religious right” are not synonymous.

  2. The point about people being scared of more kids being gay because of having gay parents is a good one. It’s similar to the argument about whether you’re born gay or become gay.

    It’s only an issue if you view it as a problem, right?

Leave a Reply